Effects Of Radiation On Health Essay Free

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The Effects of Radiation Essay

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The Effects of Radiation

Radiation is the emission of electromagnetic energy that is given off in the form of high speed particles that cause ionization. During ionization radiation hits and knocks electrons from an atom creating charged ions. Due to the electron being stripped away from the atom this break the chemical bond. Living tissue within the human body is damaged and attempts to repair it but sometimes the damage is beyond repair. Radiation can either be ionizing or non-ionizing depending on how the radiation itself affects matter. Non-ionizing radiation includes visible light, heat, microwaves, and radio waves. This particular type of radiation deposits energy in the materials that it passes through but cannot break…show more content…

The Effects of Radiation

Radiation is the emission of electromagnetic energy that is given off in the form of high speed particles that cause ionization. During ionization radiation hits and knocks electrons from an atom creating charged ions. Due to the electron being stripped away from the atom this break the chemical bond. Living tissue within the human body is damaged and attempts to repair it but sometimes the damage is beyond repair. Radiation can either be ionizing or non-ionizing depending on how the radiation itself affects matter. Non-ionizing radiation includes visible light, heat, microwaves, and radio waves. This particular type of radiation deposits energy in the materials that it passes through but cannot break molecular bonds or remove electrons from atoms. Ionizing radiation on the other hand has enough energy to break molecular bonds and displace atoms. The displaced electron creates two charged particles known as ions which can cause changes in living cells. The amount of radiation and the duration of radiation exposure is what ultimately causes health issues/effects. There are two types of health effects pertaining to radiation known as stochastic and non-stochastic. Stochastic effects refer to radiation exposure given over long periods of time at low levels referred to as chronic. Non-stochastic is short-term exposure but at high levels which is referred to as acute.
Stochastic effects are those that are associated with cancer.

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